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Where is Cannabis Legal Around the World?

states with legal cannabis

Alabama

  • Patients must not use more than 50 milligrams of approved marijuana product per day

The Alabama Legislature approved its medical cannabis program in 2021. SB46, sponsored by Senator Tim Melson (R), was introduced in February 2021 and signed into law by Governor Kay Ivey in May 2021. With the medical program, participating patients are allowed to use medical cannabis for up to 15 conditions, including chronic pain, depression, cancer, and Parkinson's Disease. While the program is legal in theory, the patient registry isn’t open yet, so Alabamans remain unable to use or access medical cannabis. This delay is all thanks to the Commission’s failure to issue any business licenses thus far, largely because of court-ordered halts from lawsuits filed by unsuccessful applicants. There is no set time frame for a final decision.

Alaska

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 7 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Cannabis became legal for adult use in Alaska in 2014. While separate measures in 2000 and 2004 failed to pass the plant, Measure 2 passed with 53.2 percent of the vote. As of February 24, 2015, Alaskans ages 21 and above can possess up to an ounce of marijuana outside of their residences; they can also cultivate up to six plants at home, with a maximum of three being mature, flowering plants. Adults are also allowed to transfer up to an ounce of marijuana and six plants to another adult. While private consumption is fully legalized for adults, public consumption remains prohibited.

Arizona

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 5 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Cannabis was legalized in Arizona under Proposition 207—a.k.a., the Safe and Smart Arizona Act, which took effect in November 2020. The vote passed with 60 percent, opening up a safe and legal market to adults over the age of 21. While adults are allowed to possess up to an ounce of flower or grow up to six plants at home, public consumption remains illegal, and possession for personal use of 2.5 ounces to 2 pounds of marijuana is considered a felony—punishable by a minimum sentence of 6 months, a maximum sentence of 1.5 years, and a maximum fine of $150,000.

Arkansas

  • Patients can possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis product within 14 days

Arkansas voters legalized cannabis in November 2016, when the majority said yes to Issue 6. Also known as the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment, this initiative legalized the medical use of cannabis in the state. The Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment passed by a vote of 53–47, allowing patients who obtain a doctor's recommendation to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis for treatment of any of 12 qualifying medical conditions. The amendment also says that between 20-40 cannabis dispensaries and 4-8 cultivators have to be licensed by the state. No regulations have been set for patients to cultivate at home.

California

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 8 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Cannabis became fully legal in California with 2016’s Prop 64—the Adult Use of Marijuana Act. Passing 57-43, Prop 64 legalized the use, sale, and cultivation of recreational cannabis for anyone over the age of 21. Operators and consumers alike continue to wage a barrage of grievances against California’s cannabis community, as high taxes and the persistence of the underground market render successful legal operations next to impossible. However, every year brings new laws to the table that aim to right the ship, like Governor Gavin Newsom’s Assembly Bill 2188, which prohibits employers from using canna-positive results from urine or hair tests to hire, fire or penalize workers.

Colorado

  • Two ounces of flower allowed
  • 8 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Colorado legalized adult-use cannabis in 2012—one of the first U.S. states to do so. Amendment 64 passed 55-44, allowing for the consumption and/or possession of cannabis for anyone over the age of 21. The state’s medical legislation from 2000 allowed patients to possess up to two ounces of medical marijuana and grow up to six marijuana plants. Amendment 64 expanded this initiative, rendering cannabis more widely available to citizens and allowing for a thriving cannabis tourism industry, which persists and continues to expand today.

Connecticut

  • 1.5 ounces of flower or concentrate allowed
  • Up to 3 immature and 3 mature with a limit of 12 per household


In April 2018, a recreational marijuana bill in Connecticut was approved by a narrow vote and sent to the General Assembly for consideration. However, the effort stalled, and despite three separate proposed bills, none were approved. Legalization efforts were revived in 2021, with Governor Ned Lamont vowing to push for the state to be online by May 2022. On June 22, 2021, Lamont signed Senate Bill 1201, legalizing recreational cannabis in Connecticut. The law permits adults aged 21 and over to possess limited amounts of cannabis. Licensing is required for the sale, manufacture, and cultivation of cannabis, with restrictions on certain THC products.

Delaware

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 12 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

This bill legalized adult-use cannabis in Delaware, creating a regulatory structure for cultivating, manufacturing, testing, and selling. The initiative received an overwhelming “pass” from the House and Senate alike and was the culmination of a decade-long crusade from the state’s tireless advocates. The market won’t open up until later this year, but for now, gifting cannabis is legal among residents. Once given the official legal go-ahead, Delawarans will be allowed to possess up to one ounce of flower, up to 12 grams of concentrate or hash, and up to 750 mg of edibles at a time.

District of Columbia

  • Two ounces of flower allowed
  • 5 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Residents of Washington, D.C. voted “yes” on legal adult-use cannabis in 2014, following a similar affirmative  on medical cannabis in 2011. Adult-use Initiative 71 passed by 64.87 percent and legalized both the possession and cultivation of cannabis for personal use. Things can still get a little dicey for operators and consumers, as cannabis remains federally illegal and the federal government controls about 29 percent of the District’s land. Cannabis is prohibited in these areas, so practicing discretion and knowing your rights is incredibly important throughout the legal market.

Florida

  • 4 ounces of flower allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

While adult-use cannabis remains illegal in Florida, the state’s medical program has been intact since 2019. The program is headed by the Florida Department of Health Office of Medical Marijuana Use (OMMU), the organization that writes and implements rules for medical cannabis, oversees the statewide Medical Marijuana Use Registry, licenses Florida businesses, and certified cannabis testing labs to ensure health and safety. Under OMMU, qualifying patients can access low-THC cannabis products for healing. Only licensed medical marijuana treatment centers (MMTCs) in Florida have the authority to cultivate, process, and distribute products.

Georgia

  • Up to 20 fluid ounces of “low-THC oil”

Georgia’s Governor Nathan Deal signed HB 1—the “Haleigh’s Hope Act”— in 2015, legalizing low-THC cannabis oil rich in CBD for medical use. While the law allowed for up to eight qualifying medical conditions, no provisions were provided for in-state cultivation or distribution. Fast forward to May 2017, when SB 16 expanded the program to encompass six additional conditions—followed by two more in 2018. In April 2019, HB 324 finally permitted in-state cultivation of cannabis and sale of low-THC oil, and 2021’s SB 195 introduced the sale of cannabis tinctures, transdermal patches, lotions, and capsules while continuing to prohibit edible products and flower.

Hawaii

  • Up to four ounces of “usable marijuana”
  • Up to 10 plants allowed

In Hawaii, adult-use cannabis is still illegal, although decriminalized. On the other hand, medical cannabis has been legal in the state since 2000. Hawaii was the first state in the U.S. to pass such an initiative. Act 228 exempted physicians and their patients from facing criminal penalties for recommended cannabis use, as long as the conditions qualified. Eight dispensaries have been allowed in the state, designated by island. Growing at home is also legal for residents and the preferred form of cannabis acquisition for islanders, as long as you’re a certified patient.

Illinois

  • 30 grams of flower allowed
  • 5 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 5 plants allowed

In 2019, Illinois made history by passing the Illinois Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act, becoming the inaugural state to legalize recreational sales through legislative action rather than voter initiatives. The Act states that Illinois residents who are 21 and older may possess up to 30 grams of cannabis flower; 5 grams of cannabis concentrate; and 500 milligrams of edible THC. You can also grow up to five plants at home, but only if you’re a qualifying medical patient or practitioner.

Iowa

  • Up to 4.5g of THC per 90 days
  • No homegrow allowed

Iowa’s Medical Cannabidiol Program was designed for patients suffering from specific qualifying conditions, like ALS, Crohn’s disease, or chronic pain. However, patients need more than a qualifying illness to access medical cannabis within the state's laws. First, patients will need to obtain certification for medical cannabis from an Iowa-based, qualifying cannabis doctor. Then, patients are required to enroll in the Iowa Medical Cannabidiol Program, where they can obtain a medical marijuana card. Patients are only allowed to purchase cannabis from the approved dispensaries within the state, and they cannot possess more than 4.5g of THC per 90-day period.

Kentucky

  • 30-day supply allowed

Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear enacted Senate Bill 47 into law on March 31, 2023, legalizing medical cannabis in the state. The program is expected to launch from January 1, 2025. Once online, patients will have access to medical providers and treatment for qualifying conditions, and the program will be regulated by The Cabinet for Health and Family Services. Kentucky’s unique set of regulations, which are still being finalized, will include procedures for license issuing, requirements for random sample testing, compliance standards, packaging and labeling standards, health and safety requirements for cultivating and manufacturing, and more.

Currently, Kentucky allows the use of cannabis extracts that are high in CBD and low in THC.

Louisiana

  • 2.5 ounces of flower allowed

While adult-use cannabis remains illegal in Louisiana, the state’s medical program allows qualifying patients to access the plant. The decision came from Act 491 and Act 492—2022 legislature that worked together to organize a medical cannabis program, headed by the Louisiana Department of Health. Louisiana’s ten licensed dispensaries can choose from the state’s two licensed medical cannabis manufacturers—the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center and the Southern University Agricultural Center—who handle all growth, processing, testing, and transportation of products.

Maine

  • 2.5 ounces of flower allowed
  • 5 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 mature, 12 immature plants, and an unlimited number of seedlings

Maine voted yes on Question 1 in 2016, legalizing adult-use cannabis for anyone over the age of 21. Regulations were set by January 30, 2017, when adults were permitted to use, possess, or carry up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis. In January 2017, the legislature was adjusted to sanction a temporary halt on retail sales until February 2018. Then, on May 2, 2018, the Legislature countered the Governor's veto of LD 1719, which was meant to facilitate "the establishment and management of a regulated market in the State for adult-use marijuana." Oversight of adult-use cannabis currently falls under the jurisdiction of the Office of Cannabis Policy.

Maryland

  • 1.5 ounces of flower allowed
  • 12 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 2 plants allowed

Thanks to the passing of the Cannabis Reform Act on July 1, 2023, adult-use cannabis is now legal in Maryland. The bill, which was signed by Governor Wes Moore, legalizes the possession, use, and sale of cannabis products for anyone over the age of 21. Maryland’s legislature also mandates a nine percent sales and use tax on the retail transactions for adult-use cannabis products, which mirrors the rate applied to alcohol sales. The program is headed by the Maryland Cannabis Administration, an organization that handles licensing, social equity efforts, and all other legislative initiatives on behalf of the state’s industry.

Massachusetts

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 5 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

On November 8, 2016, Massachusetts voters passed Question 4, a groundbreaking ballot initiative supported by the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) that legalized cannabis for any adult 21 and older. Following this initial passage, adults in Massachusetts over the age of 21 were subsequently permitted to cultivate and own cannabis as of December 15, 2016. The states’ first legal cannabis sales commenced on November 20, 2018. Since then, the Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission reported that licensed retailers have sold over $7 billion worth of cannabis products to date.

Michigan

  • 2.5 ounces of flower allowed
  • 15 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 12 plants allowed

Michigan became the first midwestern state to legalize medical and adult-use cannabis with the passage of the Michigan Regulation and Taxation of Marihuana Act in 2018. Per the regulations, an adult can have up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis or up to 15 grams of marijuana concentrate. On private property, adults are allowed to possess up to 10 ounces of cannabis and any amount of cannabis grown on the premises. If 2.5 ounces is exceeded within the home, the surplus must be stored securely. Having between 2.5-5 ounces is considered a “civil infraction”, and is penalized with a maximum $500 fine.

Minnesota

  • 2 ounces of flower allowed
  • 8 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 8 plants allowed

Minnesota became the 23rd state to legalize adult-use cannabis in 2023. Governor Tim Walz signed House File 100 into effect on May 30, 2023, legalizing the possession, use, and sale of cannabis for adults over the age of 21. Under HF 100, adults are allowed to use cannabis on private property, unless the property owner prohibits it. Cannabis consumption is also legal in private residences and at venues that hold licenses or event permits. However, as of now, no licenses or permits are available yet. Cannabis use remains illegal for adults operating motor vehicles or heavy machinery; it is also illegal in areas where smoking and vaping are banned under the Minnesota Clean Indoor Air Act (MCIAA).

Mississippi

  • 98 grams of cannabis product allowed

Adult-use cannabis remains illegal in Mississippi, but the state legalized its inaugural medical program in 2022. The program is headed by the Mississippi Department of Revenue, which handles all licensing, regulating, and law-enforcing for the state’s medical dispensaries. The agency will specifically oversee: patient card administration; medical practitioners; cannabis cultivation facilities; cannabis processing facilities; cannabis testing facilities; cannabis waste disposal facilities; and cannabis transportation facilities. The Revenue’s Alcoholic Beverage Control Enforcement Division will act as the Department’s point division for licensing and dispensary regulation. The Division will also be responsible for enforcing medical cannabis laws mapped out by the Mississippi Medical Cannabis Act.

Missouri

  • 3 ounces of cannabis product allowed
  • Up to six flowering plants, six immature plants, and six plants under 14 inches

Missouri legalized adult-use cannabis in 2022, and sales commenced on February 3, 2023. The Marijuana Legalization Initiative legalized possession, usage, and sale of the plant and its products, with a four percent state tax on all medical sales and six percent sales tax on adult-use (in addition to state taxes, in both cases). Adults over the age of 21 are allowed to purchase up to three ounces at a time, and home cultivation is permitted for up to six flowering plants, six immature plants, and/or six plants under 14 inches in size.

Montana

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 8 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 2 mature plants and 2 seedlings allowed

Montana’s HB 701 legalized the recreational use of cannabis in the state, establishing guidelines for dispensaries to sell cannabis products to adults aged 21 and older. Montana adults are also legally allowed to grow cannabis from home—up to two mature plants and two seedlings at a time. Consumption remains prohibited in public, and operating motor vehicles under the influence of cannabis is considered a crime. Also, although Montana legalized the plant, “red” counties remain: a.k.a., regions that have maintained cannabis prohibition, even in the face of HB 701.

Nevada

  • 2.5 ounces of flower allowed
  • ¼ ounces of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

In 2016, Nevada voters passed Ballot Question 2, which approved the Initiative to Regulate and Tax Marijuana. As of January 1, 2017, Nevadans over the age of 21 can legally buy, possess, and consume recreational cannabis. The program is headed by the Nevada Department of Taxation (NDT), which oversees regulations under Chapter 453D of Nevada Revised Statutes. Cannabis can only be bought from state-licensed retail stores, of which there are 120 adult-use and one medical-only option. Most dispensaries offer home delivery options, and drive-thru dispensaries are available throughout the state as well.

New Hampshire

  • 2 ounces of cannabis products
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

In 2013, New Hampshire passed HB 537, which legalized medical cannabis for approved patients with qualifying conditions. In 2021, two bills (HB 89 and HB 605) expanded said qualifying conditions, with HB 605 allowing out-of-state patients to buy limited amounts of cannabis while visiting. Attempts to legalize recreational use failed in 2021 and 2022 due to pushback from the Senate Judiciary Committee. Still, lawmakers are persistently introducing bills in 2024 to legalize adult use (HB 344 and HB 544), expunge past convictions, and enhance the medical program, including home cultivation and increasingly expanded qualifying conditions (HB 1240 and HB 1278).

New Jersey

  • 6 ounces of cannabis product
  • Up to 6 plants for adult-use, up to 10 for personal medical use

New Jersey’s Governor Phil Murphy signed off on the New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory, Enforcement Assistance, and Marketplace Modernization Act in 2020, introducing the legalization and regulation of cannabis for adults over the age of 21. The Act also decriminalized possession of cannabis and hashish for adults over the age of 21. Murphy then signed S-3454 into law, which specified penalties for cannabis use and possession among anyone under the age of 21. New Jersey’s legal market currently offers consumers their pick of 38 operational dispensaries, with 13 catering exclusively to medical cannabis patients.

New Mexico

  • 2 ounces of flower allowed
  • 16 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Governor Lujan Grisham signed New Mexico’s Cannabis Regulation Act (HB 2) into law on April 12, 2021, following a special legislative session prompted by the failure to legalize the plant during the regular 2021 session. The bill legalized cannabis possession for adults over the age of 21, with no possession limit for home consumption and a two-ounce limit outside the home. Retail sales are subject to a 12 percent excise tax along with regular sales taxes, which are slated to rise to 18 percent by 2030. While public consumption remains illegal, businesses can offer on-site consumption if certain criteria are met. The bill included automatic expungement of any arrests or convictions for those who were targeted by the War on Drugs.

New York

  • 3 ounces of flower allowed
  • 24 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Adult-use cannabis is legal in New York per the Marihuana Regulation and Taxation Act (MRTA), which was signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo on March 31, 2021. The program is headed by New York’s Office of Cannabis Management, the government body that handles purview of all licensing and regulation for the legal market. New York’s MRTA also expunged previous cannabis-related criminal records for anyone who was negatively affected by the country’s War on Drugs, and New York State prohibits employers from testing prospective and/or current employees for cannabis use—or otherwise discriminating against employees who use cannabis outside of work hours—as of October 2021.

North Dakota

  • Up to 7.5 ounces of cannabis products, depending on qualifying condition

North Dakota voters passed Measure 5 in 2016, legalizing medical cannabis in the state for anyone with qualifying conditions. The state established the North Dakota Medical Marijuana Program to oversee patient registration, dispensaries, and caregivers. As of 2023, around 9,700 patients are enrolled. To qualify, patients must obtain a medical cannabis certificate from a doctor, along with proof of a qualifying condition. Once approved, patients are allowed to possess up to 7.5 ounces of cannabis at a time, depending on their condition.

Ohio

  • 2.5 ounces of flower allowed
  • 15 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed

Ohio voters passed Issue 2 last November, legalizing adult-use cannabis in the state. However, the shiny new law comes with quite a few caveats. While adults over the age of 21 can possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis flower and 15 grams of extract, there are currently no authorized sellers as the state processes licenses. The program is expected to officially start in June. Furthermore, employers can still test employees for cannabis, and smoking remains restricted in public indoor places. The Senate has passed a bill modifying the law, which would provide an avenue for immediate adult-use sales through medical dispensaries, but the House has yet to agree.

Oregon

  • 8 ounces of flower allowed
  • 1 ounce of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 4 plants allowed

Oregon voters were among the first in the nation to vote “yes” on medical cannabis in 1998, and they were similarly eager to pass the adult-use initiative known as Measure 91 in 2014. The state is known for being progressive in how it deals with substance regulation; voters decriminalized possession of all hard drugs in 2020, paving the way for psychedelic therapy trials and further plant-medicine research advances for the state. Former-governor Kate Brown also issued pardons in November 2022, relieving 47,144 convictions for simple cannabis possession and forgiving over $14 million in unresolved fees and fines. This mass pardon excused state-level convictions for possession of one ounce or less of cannabis prior to legalization.

Pennsylvania

  • 90-day supply allowed

Adult-use cannabis remains illegal in Pennsylvania, but the state inaugurated its restrictive medical program into its legislature in 2016. Governor Tom Wolf passed another initiative—Act 43—in 2018, which officially made legal medical cannabis available for qualifying patients at licensed dispensaries across the commonwealth. This provided long overdue relief for patients in need. Today, patients can access the medical program with relative ease; they simply have to register for the program through the Medical Marijuana Registry, verify that they qualify for medical conditions through a licensed physician, and pay the fee for their medical cannabis ID card.

Rhode Island

  • 1 ounce of flower allowed in public; up to 10 ounces allowed at home
  • 1 ounce of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 plants allowed, no more than 3 mature

The Rhode Island Cannabis Act, which went into effect in 2022, permits adults over the age of 21 to possess up to an ounce of cannabis products in public or up to 10 ounces at home. The Act, which rendered Rhode Island the 19th state to legalize adult-use cannabis, also allows for home cultivation of the plant—up to six at a time, with a maximum of three mature plants. The law also allows for the erasure of any prior citation or conviction for a cannabis-related offense that has since been decriminalized.

South Dakota

  • 3 ounces of cannabis products per 14-day period
  • Up to 3 plants allowed

South Dakota only offers medical cannabis to its residents, and the program is one of the harshest in the country. It was established in 2021, following the passage of ballot initiative Measure 26 from 2020. Until then, cannabis had been entirely prohibited in South Dakota, as it was the only state in the U.S. to outlaw the ingestion of controlled substances. Testing positive for cannabis could lead to a misdemeanor offense. And for recreational users, possession of cannabis products in any quantity is considered a Class 4 felony, with a potential sentence of up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $20,000.

Vermont

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 5 grams of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 2 plants allowed

Medical cannabis has been legal in Vermont since 2004, and adult-use products joined the state’s offerings in October 2022—the 11th U.S. state to do so per Bill S.54. Under the bill, 21-and-older adults can purchase up to one ounce of cannabis or 8,400 milligrams of THC at a time. Consumers are subject to a 14 percent retail excise tax, and dispensary employees are required to attend training seminars once every three years. The program is regulated by the state’s Cannabis Control Board, who are responsible for administering both adult-use and medical regulations throughout Vermont.

Virginia

  • 28 grams of cannabis products allowed
  • Up to 4 plants allowed

Another year, another attempt at a more expansive adult-use cannabis program in Virginia. The plant was fully legalized in 2021, when the Virginia Cannabis Control Authority (CCA) was created, but the current law prohibits most practices that resemble retail transactions. Several statutory sections within the Virginia Code have been added to address the establishment of a legal recreational market, but nothing has moved forward yet. On February 28, the Virginia General Assembly passed HB 698, which would legalize retail sales in the Commonwealth. It now heads to Governor Glenn Youngkin, where its future remains uncertain.

Washington

  • 28 grams of flower allowed
  • 7 grams of concentrates allowed

On December 6, 2012, Washington became the first U.S. state to legalize the recreational use of cannabis, followed closely by Colorado later that year. This decision, fueled by Initiative 502, legalized the use, possession, and sale of cannabis products for anyone over the age of 21. The initiative faced little opposition. In fact, its most vocal opponents were the medical cannabis community, who feared the leglisation’s DUI guidelines were too strict and that the adult-use market might hurt the medical sector. However, I-502 passed regardless, and the state has enjoyed over a decade of thriving sales and industry growth.

West Virginia

  • 30-day supply allowed

West Virginia legalized medical cannabis in 2017 with the passage of SB 386. The bill was signed into law on April 19, 2017, by Governor Jim Justice. The Medical Cannabis Act allows for medical cannabis products to be used by West Virginia residents with a serious and qualifying medical condition. The program remains quite restrictive, only allowing for the sale and use of  the plant in the following forms: pill; oil, topicals, including gels, ointments, or creams; a form “medically appropriate for administration by vaporization or nebulization”; dry leaf or plant form; dermal patch; liquid; or tincture.

Oklahoma

  • 3 ounces of flower allowed on person, 8 ounces in residence
  • 1 ounce of concentrates allowed
  • Up to 6 mature plants allowed

HB 2154 legalized the sale of CBD oil containing less than 0.3 percent THC for Oklahoma residents in 2015, and the state enjoyed another win in 2018 with the passing of State Question 788. The referendum legalized cannabis for medical patients—the 30th U.S. state to do so. The program is headed by the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority (OMMA), which reports to the state Board of Health on license regulation for growers and patients alike. While adult-use cannabis remains illegal, Oklahomans enjoy one of the most liberal medical programs in the country. Patients can possess up to three ounces of flower, six mature plants, six seedling plants, one ounce of concentrated cannabis, 72 ounces of edibles, and up to eight ounces of cannabis in a home residence.

Utah

  • Up to 113 grams of cannabis flower
  • Up to 20 grams of cannabis concentrate

The first state to explicitly ban cannabis has finally started to turn around. After legalizing the use of low-THC CBD oil in 2014 under Governor Gary Herbert, Utah moved on to legalize medical cannabis under the Utah Controlled Substances Act in 2018. The program is headed by the Utah Center for Medical Cannabis, which reports to the state’s Department of Health & Human Services. Despite this progress, the program is quite restrictive, and the state remains largely opposed to the use of recreational cannabis.

Kansas

CBD dispensaries in Kansas sell products with up to five percent of THC.

Indiana

Indianans are permitted to buy, sell, and/or possess CBD oil with less than 0.3 percent THC.

North Carolina

In North Carolina, hemp-sourced cannabis products with less than a 0.3-percent of THC are allowed.

South Carolina

In South Carolina’s incredibly limited program, you can access cannabis products with no more than nine-tenths of one percent of THC.

Tennessee

Tennessee offers the same program as South Carolina but with a few more qualifying conditions on their patient list.

Texas

Texans can access up to one percent of THC in their CBD products.

Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, you can access CBD with up to 0.3 percent THC.

Wyoming

In Wyoming, those with intractable epilepsy can possess hemp products containing less than 0.3 percent THC and more than 15 percent CBD.

State

Recreational?

Year legalized

Medical?

Year legalized

Home grow?

Alabama

No

N/A

Yes

2021

No

Alaska

Yes

2014

Yes

1998

Yes

Arizona

Yes

2020

Yes

2010

Yes

Arkansas

No

N/A

Yes

2016

No

California

Yes

2016

Yes

1996

Yes

Colorado

Yes

2012

Yes

2000

Yes

Connecticut

Yes

2021

Yes

2012

Yes

Delaware

Yes

2023

Yes

2011

Yes

District of Columbia

Yes

2015

Yes

2011

Yes

Florida

No

N/A

Yes

2016

No

Georgia

No

N/A

Yes

2015

No

Hawaii

No

N/A

Yes

2000

Yes

Idaho

No

N/A

No

N/A

No

Illinois

Yes

2019

Yes

2013

Yes

Indiana

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

Iowa

No

N/A

Yes*

2017

No

Kansas

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

Kentucky

No

N/A

Yes*

2023

No

Louisiana

No

N/A

Yes

2015

No

Maine

Yes

2016

Yes

1999

Yes

Maryland

Yes

2022

Yes

2013

Yes

Massachusetts

Yes

2016

Yes

2012

Yes

Michigan

Yes

2018

Yes

2008

Yes

Minnesota

Yes

2023

Yes

2014

Yes

Mississippi

No

N/A

Yes

2022

No

Missouri

Yes

2022

Yes

2016

Yes

Montana

Yes

2020

Yes

2004

Yes

Nebraska

No

N/A

No

N/A

No

Nevada

Yes

201

Yes

1998

Yes

New Hampshire

No

N/A

Yes

2013

Yes

New Jersey

Yes

2020

Yes

2010

Yes

New Mexico

Yes

2021

Yes

2007

Yes

New York

Yes

2021

Yes

2014

Yes

North Carolina

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

North Dakota

No

N/A

Yes

2016

No

Ohio

Yes

2023

Yes

2016

Yes

Oklahoma

No

N/A

Yes

2018

Yes

Oregon

Yes

2014

Yes

1998

Yes

Pennsylvania

No

N/A

Yes

2016

No

Rhode Island

Yes

2022

Yes

2006

Yes

South Carolina

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

South Dakota

No

N/A

Yes

2020

Yes

Tennessee

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

Texas

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

Utah

No

N/A

Yes

2018

No

Vermont

Yes

2020

Yes

2004

Yes

Virginia

Yes

2021

Yes

2020

Yes

Washington

Yes

2012

Yes

1998

No

West Virginia

No

N/A

Yes

2017

No

Wisconsin

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

Wyoming

No

N/A

No*

N/A

No

*States with Low-THC Access Only

The following nine states have enacted rules and regulations for low-THC products for medical purposes. They are not generally considered comprehensive medical marijuana programs given their lack of access to medical marijuana products and the small number of qualifying conditions. For example, the Texas Compassionate Use Act allows low-THC cannabis for epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, spasticity, autism, ALS, terminal cancer, and neurodegenerative disease as recommended by a qualified physician. According to the Compassionate Use Registry of Texas, about 400 physicians are qualified to prescribe cannabis to a population of 30 million, with only three approved retailers.

Indiana

Indianans are permitted to buy, sell, and/or possess CBD oil with less than 0.3 percent THC. 

Iowa

In Iowa, you can purchase consumable hemp products with up to four milligrams of THC per serving and 10 milligrams of THC per package.

Kansas

CBD dispensaries in Kansas sell products with up to five percent of THC. 

Kentucky

Kentucky allows the use of cannabis extracts that are high in CBD and low in THC.

North Carolina

In North Carolina, hemp-sourced cannabis products with less than a 0.3-percent of THC are allowed.

South Carolina

In South Carolina’s incredibly limited program, you can access cannabis products with no more than nine-tenths of one percent of THC. 

Tennessee

Tennessee offers the same program as South Carolina but with a few more qualifying conditions on their patient list. 

Texas

Texans can access up to one percent of THC in their CBD products.

Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, you can access CBD with up to 0.3 percent THC.

Wyoming

In Wyoming, those with intractable epilepsy can possess hemp products containing less than 0.3 percent THC and more than 15 percent CBD.

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